How to Buy Safe Toys

Children can have a lot of fun playing with their toys. However, it’s important to keep in mind that safety should always come first. Each year thousands of children are injured by toys.

Read on to learn what to look for when buying toys and how a few simple ideas for safe use can often prevent injuries.

Preventing Injuries from Toys:

Most injuries from toys are minor cuts, scrapes, and bruises. However, toys can cause serious injury or even death. This happens when toys are dangerous or used in the wrong way.

10 Toy Buying Tips:

Here are tips to help you choose safe and appropriate toys for your child.

  1. Read the label. Warning labels give important information about how to use a toy and what ages the toy is safe for. Be sure to show your child how to use the toy the right way.
  2. Think LARGE. Make sure all toys and parts are larger than your child’s mouth to prevent choking.
  3. Avoid toys that shoot objects into the air. They can cause serious eye injuries or choking.
  4. Avoid toys that are loud to prevent damage to your child’s hearing. See 10 Tips to Preserve Your Child’s Hearing during the Holidays​.
  5. Look for stuffed toys that are well made. Make sure all the parts are on tight and seams and edges are secure. It should also be machine washable. Take off any loose ribbons or strings to avoid strangulation. Avoid toys that have small bean-like pellets or stuffing that can cause choking or suffocation if swallowed.
  6. Buy plastic toys that are sturdy. Toys made from thin plastic may break easily.
  7. Avoid toys with toxic materials that could cause poisoning​​​. Make sure the label says “nontoxic.”
  8. Avoid hobby kits and chemistry sets for any child younger than 12 years. They can cause fires or explosions and may contain dangerous chemicals. Make sure your older child knows how to safely handle these kinds of toys.
  9. Electric toys should be “UL Approved.” Check the label to be sure.
  10. Be careful when buying crib toys. Soft objects, loose bedding, or any objects that could increase the risk of entrapment, suffocation, or strangulation should be kept out of the crib. Any hanging crib toy (mobiles, crib gyms) should be out of the baby’s reach and must be removed when your baby first begins to push up on his or her hands and knees or when the baby is 5 months old, whichever occurs first. These toys can strangle a baby. See Reduce the Risk of SIDS & Suffocation.

Choosing the Right Toys for the Right Age:

Age recommendations on toys can be helpful, because they offer guidelines on the following:

  • The safety of the toy (for example, if there any possible choking hazards)
  • The ability of a child to play with the toy
  • The ability of a child to understand how to use a toy
  • The needs and interests at various levels of a child’s development

Important Information About Recalled Toys:

One of the goals of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)​ is to protect consumers and families from dangerous toys. It sets up rules and guidelines to ensure products are safe and issues recalls of products if a problem is found. Toys are recalled for various reasons including unsafe lead levelschoking​ or fire hazards​, or other problems that make them dangerous. Toys that are recalled should be removed right away. If you think your child has been exposed to a toy containing lead, ask your child’s doctor about testing for elevated blood lead levels. See Blood Lead Levels: What Parents Need to Know

Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org:

 

Source Adapted from A Parent’s Guide to Toy Safety (Copyright © 2008 American Academy of Pediatrics)

Healthy Tips to Help Prevent Diabetes
More than 1 in 3 Americans have prediabetes — and 90% of them don’t even know it.1 The good news is that most cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable — healthy lifestyle changes can help you avoid, control, or even reverse the disease.2
Keep your weight in check
Excess weight is the primary cause of type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing just 7 to 10% of your current weight can cut your risk in half.2 Maintaining a healthy weight can help prevent other health problems, too — including heart disease and certain types of cancer.
Be carb-smart
Limit sugar and refined carbohydrates like white bread, pasta, and rice. Focus on high-fiber, whole-grain complex carbohydrates — they’re digested more slowly, which helps keep your blood sugar steady.
Stay active to stay healthy
Inactivity promotes type 2 diabetes, so regular exercise is essential. You don’t have to spend hours sweating in the gym to get the benefits — just walking briskly for a half hour every day can reduce your risk by up to 30%.
Health Fair

Clean Hands

I’ve never met anyone who got sick from clean habits, but I have known a lot of people who have suffered the consequences of not practicing cleanliness. Two of the easiest and most important things you can do to stay healthy is handwashing, and, keeping your hands from away from (touching) your face.

Wash your hands frequently and dry them thoroughly. Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose, and mouth because that is the easiest way to transfer germs and viruses into your system, and get sick.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says, “Clean Hands Save Lives!”

Here is some handwashing information I found on the internet from various websites. It is very useful. I suggest you make a lifetime commitment to proper handwashing.

When and How to Wash Your Hands
Keeping your hands clean is one of the most important steps to avoid getting sick and spreading germs. Many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water. If clean, running water is not accessible, use soap and available water. If soap and water are unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol to clean hands. Note: Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs and might not remove harmful chemicals. Hand sanitizers are not as effective (as soap and water) when hands are visibly dirty or greasy.

Rinsing your hands before you wash them may get rid of topical germs. After adding soap, lather up the soap by rubbing your hands together. Be sure to get the webs (between your fingers, including the web between your pointer finger and thumb). Continue rubbing for 15 -20 seconds. It is recommended that you wash your hands with a song. Singing your ABC’s, or Row, Row, Row Your Boat, or the Happy Birthday song, two or three times, ensures that you are spending adequate time washing your hands.

How to Use Hand Sanitizers
• Apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label for the correct amount)
• Rub your hands together
• Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry

When should you wash your hands?
• Before, during and after preparing food
• Before eating food
• Before and after caring for someone who is sick
• Before and after treating a cut or wound
• After using the toilet
• After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
• After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
• After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
• After handling pet food or pet treats
• After touching garbage

O’ Give Thanks

Every year during the month of November (Monday, November 12th at midnight — Friday, November 16th at 4:00 pm), Mountaintop Faith Ministries (MFM) embarks upon a week of ‘O Give Thanks, a week of consecration; reflecting on God’s goodness, His mercy and His grace towards us. It is during this time that we empty out or vacate our “house” and allow Jesus to take over and occupy our life in every aspect (mental, physical, financial, social and most of all spiritual). We exchange what we need to survive for what we need to live and that is Christ.

Fasting is a faith-move. We believe that because we are empty and ready to receive from God that the Holy Spirit will speak to us more clearly, filling us with His wisdom, knowledge and understanding.

From a physical aspect, fasting helps to detox our bodies, especially, if we replace food with fresh water.  Fasting helps reduce clogged arteries and lowers heart disease. So as we go through the week of ‘O Give Thanks, let us fast, pray, mediate and praise God for this is truly the embodiment of health and wellness.

Someone once said, “Fasting without prayer is just dieting.”  When you are doing a spiritual fast, it automatically comes by “prayer and fasting.” (Matthew 17:21). And so in health and wellness we do not “diet;” but rather, we ‘cleanse’ and focus on the entire body, mind and soul.

Prayer – taking time out to communicate with our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ through word or thought.

Fasting- a willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time.

Healthy Eating – eating a variety of foods that give you nutrients such as: protein, carbohydrates, fat, water, vitamins, and minerals you need to maintain your health, feel good, and have energy.

Wellness – the state of being in good health, especially as an actively pursued goal.

Once you complete the MFM week of ‘O Give Thanks, make sure you keep it going.  Take time out weekly to fast & pray.  MFM has established every Wednesday from 12 midnight to 4 pm as their Corporate Day of fasting.  Join us, simply “Get in where you fit in.”

Note: Please consult your doctor / health professional before beginning any fast.

By Tracy Byrd, Fitness Instructor

Pink & Purple Sunday

On October 23rd, Mountaintop Faith Ministries First Aid Ministry in conjunction with CHR, Inc., (Caring, Helping and Restoring Lives) hosted their annual Pink & Purple Sunday.  The church arrayed itself in pink and/or purple to bring awareness to breast cancer and domestic violence.

First Lady Dr. Mary L. House, who is also the CEO/President of CHR, Inc. has a passion for domestic violence awareness.  She has shared her testimony of being a witness to domestic violence in her parents home; thus, bringing together the Pink & Purple Sunday to the church. During both the 8:00 am and 10:45 am services, she shared the startling statistics of both issues.

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States, other than skin cancer.  It is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, after lung cancer.  There are over 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Nevada Statistics show that breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in Nevada and is the 2nd leading cancer killer among women in the State.  It is estimated that 2,000 women in Nevada will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016 and 380 women in Nevada will die of the disease.

What can you do? Get screened and talk to your doctor about which screening test are right for you if you are at a higher risk. Have a mammogram every year starting at age 40 if you are at average risk. Have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years starting at age 20, and every year starting at age 40. You can sign up for your screening reminder at www.komen.org/reminder.

Domestic violence is a pattern of violent and coercive behavior used by one partner in a relationship to control another. Every 9 seconds in the USA a woman is assaulted or beaten. Studies suggest that up to 10 million children witness some form of domestic violence annually. An estimated 29% of African American females are victimized by intimate partner violence in their lifetime. Women in Nevada are 65% more likely to be shot and killed by intimate partners than women nationwide. Nevada has the 5th highest rate of domestic violence gun murder of any state in the country. Statistics show that Black women typically comprise about 70% of black congregations. Religious convictions and a fear of shame or rejection from the church may contribute to their remaining in abusive relationships.

Dr. House also thanked her husband, Pastor Clinton House, for allowing her the platform to bring both issues to the forefront of the church.  It is their desire that the Pink & Purple Sunday will be echoed throughout churches across the country. If you would like to become a volunteer, attend the domestic violence workshops or make a contribution, go to www.chrinc.net.

Statistics provided by: www.doj.state.or.us; www.huffingtonpost.com; www.ncadv.org; www.safenest.org; www.komennevada.org